Saucony Omni 16 vs. Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 review

Saucony Omni 16 provides a very stable and supportive running experience. Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 offers stability and support in a well-cushioned package...

NEW! Saucony Omni ISO vs. Saucony Hurricane ISO 4

The Saucony Omni 16 and the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 are stability running shoes that fall in the same category of running shoes, but the Saucony Omni 16 lies a bit higher on the stability and support scale than the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 does.

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Differences between the Saucony Omni 16 The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com and the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com start in the upper, where the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 has ISOFIT and the Saucony Omni 16 has SAUC-FIT.

Both the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 and the Saucony Omni 16 have overlays that run across the midfoot and around the heel, but the overlays on the Saucony Omni 16 cover the upper more than those on the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4.

The bunion window also displays a similar opening, but it seems to be less obstructed in the Saucony Omni 16, so the Saucony Omni 16 might offer more comfort in that area.

Both the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 and the Saucony Omni 16 come with a Support Frame at the back for extra support behind the heel, but in this case, the Support Frame of the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 covers the heel more than that of the Saucony Omni 16.

While one could say that the Saucony Omni 16 delivers more support and comfort through its upper, the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 might turn out to be as supportive and comfortable when you consider everything.

The midsoles of the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 and the Saucony Omni 16 are quite similar due to the fact that both running shoes are made by the same running shoe manufacturer.

They both come with a topsole of EVERUN cushioning and have a long post on the medial side of the midsole as an indication that these running shoes serve overpronators.

The medial post runs high in both running shoes but seems to be a tiny bit longer in the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 than it is in the Saucony Omni 16.

This would mean that the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 is also good for runners who rotate their feet inward at a later stage during the gait cycle.

Both the Saucony Omni 16 and the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 provide a good amount of ground contact under the midfoot so should be able to deliver stability as well as smoother heel-to-toe transitions.

Traditionally, Saucony running shoes tend to have a cushy forefoot, and it is no different with these two running shoes.

However, the latest versions of the stability running shoes from Saucony tend to have heels that are more moderately cushioned.

The Saucony Omni 16 displays a big difference between heel and forefoot cushioning for men in particular.

The rubber outsoles of the Saucony Omni 16 and the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 differ somewhat in construction.

While both have a zigzag pattern in the forefoot, the flex grooves run from side to side in the Saucony Omni 16 and from back to front in the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4.

Horizontal flex grooves are typically better for flexibility than vertical flex grooves such as in the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4.

Either way, both running shoes tend to be on the stiffer end of the spectrum, and this is good for the stability of the running shoes.

The women's version of the Saucony Omni 16 weighs approximately 8.4 oz (238 grams), and the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 for women weighs 9.9 oz (281 grams).

The men's versions of the running shoes weigh 10.1 oz (286 grams) and 11.2 oz (318 grams), respectively, with the Saucony Omni 16 being the lighter one.

If you are a moderate overpronator who is looking for a good amount of stability and support from a running shoe, the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 was made with your needs in mind, and if you are a moderate to severe overpronator, the Saucony Omni 16 might serve you better.

The Saucony Omni 16 is placed a bit higher in the stability and support category by Saucony, but the Saucony Hurricane ISO 4 does not lag too far behind in what it delivers to overpronators.

However, if you are more on the severe end of overpronation and do not require a motion control running shoe, the Saucony Omni 16 would be the first one to consider.

Note: The weight of a running shoe depends on the size of the running shoe, so any weights mentioned in this review may differ from the weight of the running shoe you choose to wear. Running shoes of the same size were compared for this review.

The two links above will take you to Amazon.com where you can read more about the running shoes.


This review falls under: Saucony

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