Saucony Guide ISO vs. Saucony Ride ISO review

Saucony Guide ISO provides lots of stability and support to overpronators. Saucony Ride ISO provides a soft and comfortable ride with a personalized fit to neutral runners on long runs...

The Saucony Guide ISO and the Saucony Ride ISO are running shoes for two different types of runners.

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The Saucony Guide ISO The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com is for mild to moderate overpronators, while the Saucony Ride ISO is for neutral runners.

The uppers of the Saucony Guide ISO and the Saucony Ride ISO are similar in that they both make use of ISOFIT.

However, the Saucony Ride ISO The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com also has FORMFIT technology implemented in its upper, which helps the upper better adapt to the form and motion of your foot.

Both running shoes have no-sew overlays that connect the saddle to the midsole, but the overlays on the Saucony Guide ISO continue to run along the upper edge of the midsole in the forefoot, while those on the Saucony Ride ISO don't.

This means that the Saucony Guide ISO might close your forefoot in a bit more than the Saucony Ride ISO, but because the bunion window has been kept pretty open in both running shoes, runners who have big bunions should still be able to get enough comfort in the toe box of both running shoes.

The Saucony Ride ISO also does not have any overlays running on its toe box, because it makes use of engineered mesh that provides enough support without the need for overlays.

Therefore, the toe box of the Saucony Ride ISO might feel a bit more open and free than that of the Saucony Guide ISO.

The Saucony Guide ISO has overlays around the heel for added support, while the Saucony Ride ISO comes with a woven area around the heel for structure and support.

All in all, you should be able to get a similar amount of support around the midfoot of the two running shoes, with the Saucony Guide ISO delivering a bit more support around the heel and the Saucony Ride ISO feeling a bit more comfortable in the forefoot.

The upper of both running shoes is adjustable through the saddle, but the Saucony Ride ISO might provide a slightly more personalized fit than the Saucony Guide ISO.

The midsoles of the Saucony Guide ISO and the Saucony Ride ISO come with a topsole of EVERUN for heel-to-toe cushioning.

Saucony describes both running shoes as delivering a blend of cushioning and responsiveness and lists both of them on the same location at the beginning of the plush cushioning scale.

According to lab tests, the Saucony Guide ISO has a cushy forefoot for both men and women, with women getting a bit more forefoot cushioning than men.

The Saucony Ride typically also delivers a lot of forefoot cushioning but not so much that it will hold you back. The two running shoes are pretty similar where amount of forefoot cushioning is concerned.

The amount of heel cushioning is on the moderate side in the Saucony Guide ISO, and the heel of the running shoe might even feel firm to some runners.

The Saucony Ride generally has a more even balance between heel and forefoot cushioning, which tends to give the running shoe an overall cushy feel.

The main difference between the midsoles of the Saucony Guide ISO and the Saucony Ride ISO is the fact that the Saucony Guide ISO has a post on the medial side to help stop the feet of overpronators from rolling too far inward.

This post has an average length and is located under the midfoot but also delivers some pronation control under the heel and part of the forefoot. Such a location would suit the average overpronator.

The Saucony Ride ISO does not have a medial post but delivers a good amount of ground contact right under the arch, which adds some degree of stability to the running shoe but not as much as the Saucony Guide ISO does with its medial post.

Neutral runners do not need the stability and support delivered by the medial post of the Saucony Guide ISO and are generally happier with cushioning rather than stability and support.

The outsoles of the two running shoes display a zigzag pattern in the forefoot and are well segmented under the heel.

Both have rubber that is more or less flat on the medial side. They both also have a good amount of flex grooves in the forefoot, but the flex grooves of the Saucony Ride ISO are less interrupted by rubber than those of the Saucony Guide ISO, so the Saucony Ride ISO is expected to be a bit more flexible than the Saucony Guide ISO.

According to lab tests, the Saucony Guide ISO is stiff for both men and women, but stiffness generally adds stability to a running shoe.

The women's version of the Saucony Guide ISO weighs approximately 8.9 oz (253 grams), and the Saucony Ride ISO for women weighs 8.5 oz (241 grams).

The men's versions of the running shoes weigh 10.5 oz (298 grams) and 9.7 oz (275 grams), respectively, with the Saucony Ride ISO being the lighter one.

Making a decision between the Saucony Guide ISO and the Saucony Ride ISO should be a no-brainer, because the Saucony Guide ISO is for mild to moderate overpronators, and the Saucony Ride ISO is for neutral runners.

Both the Saucony Guide ISO and the Saucony Ride ISO are capable of delivering a smooth ride.

The difference is that the Saucony Guide ISO is much more stable and supportive than the Saucony Ride ISO, while the Saucony Ride ISO might excel in comfort and delivering a more personalized fit.

Note: The weight of a running shoe depends on the size of the running shoe, so any weights mentioned in this review may differ from the weight of the running shoe you choose to wear. Running shoes of the same size were compared for this review.

The two links above will take you to Amazon.com where you can read more about the running shoes.


This review falls under: Saucony

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