Saucony Stabil CS3 review

Saucony Stabil CS3 provides reinforced stability and a good amount of cushioning to severe overpronators. It is the successor of the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2. Learn what got better...

NEW! Saucony Redeemer vs. Saucony Stabil CS3

The Saucony Stabil CS3 is a sneaker for runners who need plenty of pronation control, but still want their running shoes to look good on their feet. The Saucony Stabil CS3 is the successor of the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS 2.

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The first thing Saucony did with the Saucony Stabil CS3 was trim it down and make it a bit lighter and more flexible than other older motion control running shoes, but still maintain the stability features the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS is known for.

The upper of the Saucony Stabil CS3 consists of breathable mesh with synthetic overlays.

The overlays include Sauc-Fit, which secures the upper around the midfoot and towards the back of your foot on the medial side of the shoe.

This way your foot stays securely put on the running platform. The Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 uses Arch-Lock on the medial side of the upper to provide a secure fit.

Both Sauc-Fit and Arch-Lock are stretchy components that provide a secure midfoot fit, but Sauc-Fit allows for more movement of the heel and the forefoot of the shoe with the foot.

The Sauc-Fit is located a little bit more directly above the arch than the Arch-Lock in the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2, which should give your toes in the toe box a little bit more room to move.

However, the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 has a more "open" bunion window in comparison to the Saucony Stabil CS3, which has an overlay running over the bunion window, so any bunions would probably feel more comfortable in the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2.

The placement of the overlays on the lateral side of the shoe have not changed much between the CS3 and the CS2; the biggest change was on the medial side of the shoe.

What has also changed in the upper is the heel counter at the back of the shoe. In the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2, it was one piece cupping the heel. The Saucony Stabil CS3 now has what's called a Support Frame that consists of two symmetrical pieces on the side of the heel and one in the center to lock the heel in place while improving the fit.

The midsole of the Saucony Stabil CS3 consists of PowerGrid lightweight cushioning along its entire length. The Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 has ProGrid cushioning in its midsole. They both use grid technology to center the foot, absorb shock, and distribute pressure for a smooth and responsive ride.

Overpronators tend to land on the outsides of their heel. Therefore, the Saucony Stabil CS3 has an SRC impact zone on the lateral side and at the back of the shoe just under the heel that absorbs shock and sets you up for a smoother transition from heel-strike to toe-off.

The Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 has such a crash pad too, but it covers a larger area under the Saucony Stabil CS3 and extends further towards the midfoot, meaning that the Saucony Stabil CS3 should provide a little bit more shock absorption and give you a smoother transition. Your landings should also feel somewhat softer in the Saucony Stabil CS3.

The Saucony Stabil CS3 delivers stability and support through a post on the medial side of the shoe in the midsole. This post is more elongated in the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 and does not run to the top of the midsole just under the arch. So the pronation control should feel different in the two running shoes.

The outsole of the Saucony Stabil CS3 consists of a combination of high-abrasion carbon rubber for good traction and durability, and iBR, which is a type of lightweight blown rubber that provides more cushioning in the forefoot.

The Saucony Stabil CS3 provides full ground contact, while the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 has a midfoot shank that does not touch the ground on the lateral side of the shoe and that runs into the midsole on the medial side to reinforce the medial post.

The running platform of the Saucony Stabil CS3 is also broader than that of the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2, making the Saucony Stabil CS3 the more stable shoe of the two.

The outsides of the forefoot of the Saucony Stabil CS3 should feel pretty soft and flexible thanks to the flex grooves and blown rubber, while the middle of the outsole might feel a little bit rigid as you land, pronate, and take off.

However, the vertical flex groove under the heel should add a bit of lateral flexibility to your landing. The flat and rigid outsole of the Saucony Stabil CS3 combined with the medial post right under the arch should provide good support and stability.

But the layout of the rubber compartments and side-to-side flex grooves in the forefoot of the outsole of the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS2 should make it feel a bit more flexible than the Saucony Stabil CS3.

The women's version of the Saucony Stabil CS3 weighs approximately 9.9 oz (281 grams), which is 0.9 oz (26 grams) lighter than the Saucony ProGrid Stabil CS 2. The difference in the men's version of the running shoes is 1.4 oz (40 grams) with the Saucony Stabil CS3 weighing 11.9 oz (337 grams) and being the lighter one.

Compared to other motion control running shoes that deliver good support, the Saucony Stabil CS3 is right up there without being too heavy or stiff. It provides a combination of reliable support and supreme cushioning. So if you are looking for such a running shoe, the Saucony Stabil CS3 might be it.

Note: The weight of a running shoe depends on the size of the running shoe, so any weights mentioned in this review may differ from the weight of the running shoe you choose to wear. Running shoes of the same size were compared for this review.

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This review falls under: Saucony

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