Saucony Guide 8 vs. 7 review

The Saucony Guide 7 was already light with lots of cushioning. Saucony Guide 8 is lighter yet, more flexible, and more comfortable with improved transitions. Learn about the changes.

NEW! Saucony Guide 10 vs. Saucony Guide 9 and Saucony Guide 9 vs. Saucony Guide 8 and Saucony Guide 9 vs. Saucony Guide 7

Saucony has made small changes to the Saucony Guide 7 to improve the Saucony Guide 8 for runners who overpronate mildly.

ADVERTISEMENTS

The uppers of both the Saucony Guide 7 and Saucony Guide 8 are very similar. The only difference is that Saucony has replaced some of the overlays on top and at the sides of the toe box with seamless overlays.

This should bring the upper a little bit closer to the foot in that area to give you a better fit.

This should also be good news for runners with large bunions, since the bunion window in the Saucony Guide 8 is more "open", less constricted, and more comfortable than in the Saucony Guide 7.

Saucony has also changed the location of the overlay on the medial side of the shoe by moving it a bit more towards the back. It used to have a top-down pull in the Saucony Guide 7 and now it has more of a top-back pull in the Saucony Guide 8.

All in all, Saucony wanted to make the upper of the Saucony Guide 8 feel more comfortable and fit better on your foot.

The midsole of the Saucony Guide 8 has also not changed much compared to that of the Saucony Guide 7.

It still consists of dual-density SSL EVA with the firmest foam being located on the medial side of the shoe to control pronation. And the full-length PowerGrid technology is still in the midsole to center the foot, absorb shock, and distribute pressure for a more responsive run.

What has changed however is the SRC (Super Rebound Cushioning) impact zone. In the Saucony Guide 7, this SRC impact zone did not extend into the midfoot, but now it does in the Saucony Guide 8. With the full gound contact on the lateral side of the midfoot, you should experience an improved transition from heel-to-toe.

The outsoles of the Saucony Guide 7 and Guide 8 have pretty much remained the same, except for the midfoot area. The 2/3 shank in the midfoot of the Saucony Guide 7 does not support the center of the foot anymore in the Saucony Guide 8, but is only located right below the post that controls overpronation.

The rubber lugs under the heel of the Saucony Guide 8 are slightly different especially on the inside side of the heel. There was a groove between the two lugs that ran in a horizontal direction.

That direction is now more vertically aligned with the out-in movement that the foot tends to make when you land and overpronate. This should be a positive change for shock absorption and flexibility in that area.

The rubber lugs in the forefoot area of the Saucony Guide 8 have not changed much compared to those in the Saucony Guide 7.

However, the midfoot on the lateral side of the shoe has now been filled in a bit more with rubber lugs compared to the Saucony Guide 7, thereby making the transition from heel to forefoot more seamless and smooth in the Saucony Guide 8.

The women's version of the Saucony Guide 7 weighs approximately 8.2 oz (232 grams) and the Saucony Guide 8 for women weighs 8.4 oz (238 grams). The men's version of the Saucony Guide 7 weighs approximately 10.1 oz (286 grams) and the Saucony Guide 8 for men also weighs 10.1 oz (286 grams).

The Saucony Guide 7 was a very light stability running shoe and the Saucony Guide 8 remains light, but is a bit more comfortable, and with more cushioning, so you should get a stable, softer, and smoother ride from the Saucony Guide 8.

Note: The weight of a running shoe depends on the size of the running shoe, so any weights mentioned in this review may differ from the weight of the running shoe you choose to wear. Running shoes of the same size were compared for this review.

The two links above will take you to Amazon.com where you can read more about the running shoes.


This review falls under: Saucony

Disclaimer: This running shoe review on www.motioncontrolrunningshoe.org is based on personal research and analysis of data that has been made publicly available by running shoe manufacturers and other companies that are dedicated to serving runners, and is not claimed to be accurate, complete, or up to date. While the information presented in this review is intended to help you better understand the differences between running shoes, we shall not be held liable for any purchasing decisions you make based on this information. Please use your own good judgment before making a purchase. The owner of this website receives a small compensation whenever you buy a product after clicking a product link on this website. Read our full disclaimer and privacy policy.