Shoes similar to Brooks Adrenaline

The Brooks Adrenaline provides a smooth and supportive ride with cushioning that is just right. Learn which running shoes are similar to the Brooks Adrenaline and in what way.

The Brooks Adrenaline used to be a premier stability running shoe from Brooks that was known for its cushioning that is not too soft or too firm, and its excellent pronation control through a medial post in its midsole.

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With the introduction of the Brooks Adrenaline GTS 19 The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com, this changed.

The Brooks Adrenaline now has Guide Rails instead of a trusty, old-fashioned, but very supportive medial post.

Guide Rails are supposed to let your body and joints align themselves, so they do not really force your feet to move in a certain way like a medial post would.

In general, they have been rated as being somewhat less supportive than a medial post, but runners who have tried them out say that they really work.

However, if you are not yet ready to switch to an advanced support system like Guide Rails so are looking for a replacement for the Brooks Adrenaline, this article lists a few running shoes from other running shoe manufacturers that can compete with the Brooks Adrenaline of today but that still use a more tradional method of delivering pronation control.

Brooks Adrenaline alternative from ASICS

ASICS has two running shoes that you can consider instead of the Brooks Adrenaline.

The ASICS GEL-Kayano has increased in the amount of stability and support it delivers and can compete well with the Brooks Adrenaline of today.

Whereas the ASICS GEL-Kayano used to be for neutral runners and overpronators, today it is only for overpronators, so you can expect to get a good amount of support from it.

It has a comfortable upper and a secure heel fit with a heel counter that minimizes heel rotation.

While it might not deliver as much heel cushioning as the Brooks Adrenaline, it comes with a traditional midfoot shank and firmer foam on the medial side to control overpronation.

Most of the pronation control is located under the heel and partly under the midfoot of the ASICS GEL-Kayano, similar to the area covered by the Guide Rails in the Brooks Adrenaline.

If you want to extend the area of support to also include the forefoot, you may want to look into the ASICS GT-3000.

Like the ASICS GEL-Kayano, it has an external heel counter that provides a secure heel fit but less heel rotation prevention than the ASICS GEL-Kayano.

Unlike the ASICS GEL-Kayano and the Brooks Adrenaline, it comes with broad no-sew overlays around the midfoot that delivers support where overpronators need it most.

Therefore, it you need more support than what the ASICS GEL-Kayano or the Brooks Adrenaline would deliver, it is definitely worth looking into the ASICS GT-3000.

Brooks Adrenaline alternative from Saucony

Saucony has two running shoes that can compete well with the Brooks Adrenaline.

The first is the Saucony Hurricane ISO and the second is the Saucony Omni ISO.

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Both the Saucony Hurricane ISO and the Saucony Omni ISO make use of a traditional medial post to control overpronation.

The Saucony Omni ISO is listed higher in stability and support than the Saucony Hurricane ISO, but both running shoes are meant to deliver a good amount of cushioning and can deliver an overall soft ride, with the Saucony Hurricane ISO intended to feel softer under your foot than the Saucony Omni ISO.

Both the Saucony Hurricane ISO and the Saucony Omni ISO have an upper that is customizable – something that the Brooks Adrenaline does not have – and they deliver more midfoot support through their upper than the Brooks Adrenaline does, without constricting the toe box too much.

They both come with external heel counters to provide a secure heel fit, but the Saucony Omni ISO has a more heavy-duty heel counter than the Saucony Hurricane ISO.

Both running shoes are considered to be very stable and supportive, but the Saucony Omni ISO is listed higher on the support scale than the Saucony Hurricane ISO.

In conclusion, if you want comfort, support, and a soft ride that is on the level of the Brooks Adrenaline, you may want to look into the Saucony Hurricane ISO, and if you want to increase the amount of support and decrease the amount of cushioning a bit, the Saucony Omni ISO would be the one to look into.

Brooks Adrenaline alternative from Mizuno

Mizuno has two running shoes you can choose from if you are looking to replace the Brooks Adrenaline.

Mizuno stability running shoes typically do not come with a traditional medial post to control overpronation but rather make use of a Wave plate that fans out on the medial side to help stop the feet of overpronators from rolling too far inward.

Mizuno running shoes also typically deliver a good amount of cushioning even if they are meant to deliver support to runners.

The first running shoe you can look into from Mizuno to replace the Brooks Adrenaline is the Mizuno Wave Inspire.

The Mizuno Wave Inspire is one of few running shoes that still come with stitched-on overlays in its upper to deliver durable support.

It also covers a larger area around the midfoot compared to the Brooks Adrenaline, so you also get a more secure fit where you need support the most.

While the Mizuno Wave Inspire does not deliver maximum support and perhaps is a tiny bit less supportive than the old Brooks Adrenaline, it can definitely compete with the latest Brooks Adrenaline as far as support goes.

The ride you get from the Mizuno Wave Inspire is also overall soft with lots of heel cushioning.

If you want to increase the amount of cushioning as well as support, you may want to look into the Mizuno Wave Horizon, which can compete well with the Brooks Adrenaline on all fronts and delivers almost everything the old Brooks Adrenaline used to deliver.

From the two Mizuno running shoes, the Mizuno Wave Horizon comes closest to the properties of the Brooks Adrenaline.

Brooks Adrenaline alternative from New Balance

New Balance has two running shoes you can look at if you want to replace the Brooks Adrenaline.

The first is the New Balance 860 and the second is the New Balance 1260.

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The New Balance 860 has a very long medial post like the Brooks Adrenaline used to have, so you know that it delivers lots of support and covers a large area of support.

It also comes with a midfoot shank on the medial side under the midfoot to increase the amount of support you get in that area.

Its upper has been kept comfortable in the forefoot and it delivers lightweight support from midfoot to heel.

The cushioning of the New Balance 860 should feel responsive yet comfortable under your foot, and the blown rubber in the outsole should add softness to your ride.

What the New Balance 860 does not have, though, is a long crash pad like older Brooks Adrenaline versions used to have.

However, the New Balance 1260 has something similar in the Fuel Cell that it has on the lateral side of its midsole.

The New Balance 1260 is another New Balance running shoe that comes with a very long, traditional medial post to control overpronation.

Its upper should feel very comfortable, and it has an asymmetrical heel counter that increases the amount of support you get around the heel when your foot rolls inward.

The New Balance 1260 is meant to deliver lots of stability and a soft ride with smooth heel-to-toe transitions, just like the old Brooks Adrenaline did.

Both the New Balance 860 and the New Balance 1260 are very supportive running shoes so could replace the Brooks Adrenaline.

The main difference between the running shoes is that the New Balance 860 is meant to deliver a responsive ride, while the New Balance 1260 is meant to deliver a somewhat softer ride. It is up to you what you prefer.

Note: The weight of a running shoe depends on the size of the running shoe, so any weights mentioned in this review may differ from the weight of the running shoe you choose to wear. Running shoes of the same size were compared for this review.

The two links above will take you to Amazon.com where you can read more about the running shoes.


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