Saucony Redeemer vs. Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 review

Saucony Redeemer offers maximum pronation control and a very plush ride to severe overpronators. Brooks Beast 14 offers a cushioned and supportive ride to heavier runners.

NEW! Saucony Redeemer vs. Brooks Ariel 16 / Brooks Beast 16

The Saucony Redeemer and the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 are stability running shoes that fall in the motion control category, so are geared toward runners who severely overpronate.

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The Saucony Redeemer The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com and the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 have a lot in common.

Starting with the uppers, the Saucony Redeemer has broad and very supportive ISOFIT overlays that wrap the midfoot on both sides of the shoe to really give you a good lockdown there.

The Brooks Beast 14 The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com / Brooks Ariel 14 The preceding link takes you to Amazon.com has something similar going on with semi-broad overlays that wrap the midfoot on both sides of the shoe.

The main difference is that the ISOFIT overlays in the Saucony Redeemer continue around the heel, so wrap your midfoot as well as your heel. The Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14 just wraps the midfoot.

In addition, the sturdy and supportive overlays on the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14 have been pulled back to really open up the forefoot.

The overlays in the Saucony Redeemer ISO come further forward than those in the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14, so the latter may feel more comfortable in the forefoot area.

Both running shoes have lighter no-sew overlays running over the toe box, with the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 having more of them, since the sturdier overlays have been pulled back.

Finally, while the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14 just has a stitched-on piece at the back for added support, the Saucony Redeemer ISO has a Support Frame that cups the heel well to keep it in place.

In summary, the amount of support provided through the upper is a bit more in the Saucony Redeemer ISO than it is in the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14, but the forefoot comfort might be more in the latter.

However, both running shoes provide enough support where it is needed most.

Both the Saucony Redeemer ISO and the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 provide heel-to-toe cushioning through their midsoles, and both running shoes are meant to provide you with a well-cushioned ride.

The Saucony Redeemer ISO has a crash pad under the heel that runs till the midfoot to join the forefoot and provide you with a smooth transition to toe-off after landing.

The Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 also has a crash pad, but the crash pad is not only located under the heel; it has a second piece that continues into the forefoot, so turns out to be longer than that of the Saucony Redeemer ISO.

Therefore, you can not only expect the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 to provide you with a soft landing, but also with a smoother transition from heel-strike to toe-off.

The second stage of pronation control kicks in on the medial side, where both running shoes have a piece of firmer foam to stop your foot from rolling too far inward. There are several differences to be noted in this medial post.

For starters, the medial post of the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 consists of several densities of foam, starting with the softest at the back of the shoe, and gradually entering into the firmest in the post itself. The Saucony Redeemer ISO has just one density.

Another difference is the midfoot shank that hooks into the medial post to provide reinforcement. This midfoot shank has a bow structure with pillars in the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14, that runs half-way up into the medial post.

The Saucony Redeemer ISO does not have a midfoot shank, but rather just implements pillars that hook into the medial post. In addition, the medial post of the Saucony Redeemer ISO is more squarish at its ends than that of the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14.

All in all, you should get a great degree of pronation control from both running shoes. However, they differ in the location of applied control with the Saucony Redeemer ISO having a more uniformly distributed control and the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14 a more gradual one.

The outsole of the Brooks Ariel 14 / Brooks Beast 14 differs quite a bit from that of the Saucony Redeemer ISO.

While both running shoes provide a wide and linear platform that adds to the stability of the running shoes, the Brooks Ariel 14 / Brooks Beast 14 introduces a separation between the forefoot and rearfoot due to the midfoot shank that it implements.

Another difference is caused by the medial post that clearly takes up space under the Saucony Redeemer ISO and makes the medial side of the outsole straighter than that of the Brooks Beast 14 / Ariel 14, which has a more traditional curve.

Both running shoes have a good amount of separation between their rubber compartments for good shock absorption and dissipation.

The Saucony Redeemer ISO is a newcomer. If you have been a fan of the Brooks Beast / Brooks Ariel, there is no need to switch, unless you are after more support in the upper.

The Saucony Redeemer ISO weighs a little bit less than the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14, but the difference is not huge. Both running shoes can be worn by bigger and heavier runners, and both running shoes provide tons of stability and support.

The main decision point, I think, will be in the type of comfort and pronation control you are after. For more comfort in the forefoot and a more gradual degree of pronation control, you may want to look into the Brooks Beast 14 / Brooks Ariel 14 more than in the Saucony Redeemer ISO.

Note: The weight of a running shoe depends on the size of the running shoe, so any weights mentioned in this review may differ from the weight of the running shoe you choose to wear. Running shoes of the same size were compared for this review.

The two links above will take you to Amazon.com where you can read more about the running shoes.


This review falls under: Brooks | Saucony

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